Weaving

Weaving

 
 
Weaving is the interlacing of horizontal and vertical yarn to make textiles. There are many variations of this technique. The yarn used to weave textiles can be made of a whole array of different materials.
 
Technique
In weaving, a number of threads are aligned vertically. This is called warping and these threads are known as warp threads. Once these are in place, other threads are interlaced horizontally on a loom, at right angles to the vertical warp. These are called weft threads and they are packed tightly against each other.
 
Patterns
On a weaving loom, the warp threads can be lifted up. Lifting or lowering the warp threads in a specific pattern determines the weave of the fabric.
  • Basic patterns make use of linen weave, also known as flat weave or plain weave. In this case, the weft thread crosses the warp thread by going over one, then under the next. The one weft thread crosses the evenly numbered warp threads, while the crosses the uneven warp threads.
  • Complicated patterns arise when the weft thread crossing two or more warp threads at a time. Combinations are also possible.
Finishing
All woven fabrics are unfinished when they come from the loom. Limited editions can then be supplied with a quality finish (this can be done internally or externally).
 
The TextielLab has a good network of companies that specialise in this field, including:
  • Washing
  • Adding flame-retardant coatings or finishing seams
 
The warp is a set element in weaving, whereas the weft can make use of almost any type of thread. The TextielLab works with different types of warps including organic cotton, linen or wool, in various colours.
It is possible to make a custom warp for a specific project. For special warps, a minimum of 100 meters of fabric must be produced.
 
Contact the front office of the TextielLab for possibilities regarding the warp.
 
 
This technique is usually used for:
 
  • Interior fabrics
  • Wall hangings
  • Fashion fabrics
  • Household textiles
We generally differentiate between:
 
  1. Single weaves
    Application: tea towels, table textiles, fashion fabrics, throws and wall coverings.
  2. Double weaves
    Application: wall hangings.
    Principle: split warps, different types of wefts possible.
In the TextielLab weaving is used to make following products:
 
  1. Unique wall hangings for interiors (voorbeeld toevoegen)
  2. Autonomous wall hangings (voorbeeld toevoegen)
  3. Household textiles in limited editions (such as table textiles, tea towels)
  4. Consumer products (laptop sleeves, room dividers, stools)
  5. Interior fabrics (throws, upholstery fabrics)
  6. Fashion fabrics (voorbeeld toevoegen)
Van Eijk & van der Lubbe (Yearbook 2013)
 
Chris Kabel (Yearbook 2013)
 
Kustaa Saksi (Yearbook 2013)
 
Creneau International (Yearbook 2013)
 
Aleksandra Gaca (Yearbook 2013)
 
Teun Hocks (Yearbook 2013)
 
Minale Maeda (Yearbook 2013)
 
OMA (Yearbook 2011)
 
Sarah Barkmeijer (Yearbook 2011)
 
Hotel The Exchange Amsterdam (Yearbook 2011)
 
Thonik (Yearbook 2012)
 
 
These facilities are suitable for interior architects, product designers, (fashion) designers and artists.
 
 
  • In knitting, you work towards the finished product and its shape from the start. In addition, the shape is created from one yarn. This is not the case with weaving. Every woven fabric is based on at least one warp thread and one weft thread.
  • Woven fabric is less flexible than knits, which are more elastic (compare a knitted T-shirt with a woven blouse.)
  • Weaving has a set base structure (the warp), whereas knitting has no such base structure.
  • Knitting makes loops in the fabric, whereas weaving creates knots. A knit is therefore much more pliant.

 

The TextielLab is home to three computer-operated Dornier Jacquard rapier looms, ranging from Hooks 6144 to Designhooks 6114:
 
Machine
Dornier HTVS8 / J BJ 1999
Staubli LX 1600
Machine
Dornier PTS 12 / J BJ 2006
Staubli LX 1600
Machine
Dornier PTS 12 / JC BJ 2010
Staubli LX 1602 
 
All of the looms are 200 cm wide and can weave up to 170 cm in width. Continuous patterns of up to a width of 1.70 cm can be accommodated. Shrinkage caused by washing results in a final width of about 1.65 metres.
 
It is possible to incorporate up to 12 different weft threads.
The machines are able to weave complex fabrics with patterns varying across the entire width.
 
Software
The TextielLab uses the following software programs by NEDGRAPHICS:
 
  • Texcelle Version 6.1.2.4
  • Design program for weaving
  • Product Creator Version 9.2.0.24
  • Weaving program
  • Design COM Version 6.0
  • Database for weaving specifications
  • Weave Gate Version 9.3.1.2
  • Communication with machines/data flow to machines
  • Fabric Editor Version 9.1 Rev 0
  • Altering programmes by hand
  • Weave Editor Version 9.2.1.3
  • Drawing the weave
 
You can start work in the TextielLab as soon as your request has been approved and the contract has been signed. It is important to be well prepared before starting at the Lab. See below for more information.
 
A design can be submitted in a number of ways. For example, on a USB stick, CD or via e-mail. A special computer program processes the digital file and converts it.
 
TextielLab weaving essentials:
 
  • A digital file of 36 pixels per centimetre in Photoshop or Illustrator. (The warp thread in the TextielLab consists of 36 threads per centimetre). The design can be up to 6114 pixels wide (up to 169 centimetres).
  • To ensure an optimal result, it is important to be present during the fabric development.
  • For wall coverings, it is useful to have a technical drawing or model of the entire room.
  • A laptop. If required, your design can be adapted on the spot.
 
In the TextielLab, you will work together with product developers and have the support of a technical team. In this way, you can make the most of the specialist knowledge and expertise available at the TextielLab.
 
Creative team | Development & programming
Stef Miero
Marjan van Oeffelt
Judith Peskens
 
Technical team | Technical support & production
Toon van Raak
Michel Leermakers
Ron van de Pol